Microsoft's Leila Martine at TechXLR8 2019

Happy Birthday MVIS Blog



Tomorrow will mark the 1 year anniversary of the start of MVIS Blog. I've written more essays in the last year alone than I would have in four years of college. Fortunately for me, no one's been grading them! But a lot of people have been reading them and it's been great to get feedback from the folks who write in.

What began as musings about the possibilities of an investment has kind of morphed into an evolving manifesto on the present and future of technology. Of course, I feel that Microvision plays a critical role in that the scanned beam display technology represents the 'last two feet' (or more likely, the last inch) of internet infrastructure -- the interface between the trillion dollar networks, the content and service providers, and each one of us, the content and service consumers.

We've had our ups and downs over the last year and the stock price is what it is. But through just that time some truths prove to be evident: the rate of progress in technology is accelerating, and different schools of thought are merging. Biology, robotics, materials science, electrical and optical engineering -- each one of these formerly distinct fields of study is encountering overlap as each breakthrough brings the fields closer to becoming a unified science that I think of as simply progress.

Tomorrow I'm packing up my car and driving up to Seattle, so it may be a couple of days before I can get online again. Kind of fitting that on the anniversary of starting MVIS Blog I'm starting off on a new journey all over again.

Thanks everybody for sticking with me over the last year and stay tuned for updates once I get a chance to find a place to plug in my computer!

Comments

  1. THANK YOU BJ
    YOUR SA'S ARE INSIGHTFUL AND YOUR RESEARCH IS RESOURCFUL TO THOSE OF US WHO LIKE THE BROAD PRESPECTIVE ON WHAT RAMIFICATIONS MVIS TECH HAS ON OUR FUTURE. IT IS KIND OF THE A DAY TO DAY CHRONOLGY OF ORWELL'S 1984 IN THAT YOU HAVE COMPILED SO MANY LINKS AND PERSPECTIVES OVER ONE YEAR, AND ASSUMPTIVLY WILL CONTINUE TO DO SO THAT IT WILL NOT BE LONG BEFORE YOUR ARE FOOTNOTING YOUR FUTURE POSTS WITH "SEE I SAW IT COMING" S.
    YOUR BLOG IS A GREAT COMPILATION.
    THANKS
    MVIS777

    ReplyDelete
  2. Stryker drivers yearn for color



    ADVERTISEMENT








    RELATED LINKS



    "CALL criticizes Stryker" [FCW.com, March 31, 2005]


    "Stryker cameras, radios blasted" [FCW.com, March 31, 2005]


    "Covers protect army keyboards" [FCW.com, March 31, 2005]




    BY Bob Brewin
    Published on Apr. 1, 2005

    More Related Links




    There’s probably not a soldier in the Army today who grew up watching a black-and-white TV set, but crews of the Stryker armored vehicle have to rely on black-and-white displays connected to their remote weapons stations, according to an internal Army study.


    In a recent report by the Center for Army Lessons Learned (CALL) on the Iraqi operations of Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Brigade, 2nd Infantry, analysts found that crew members of the Stryker vehicles built by General Dynamics were frustrated by the black-and-white remote weapons station screens.


    “It is difficult in urban environments to communicate colors of vehicles without color” screens, the report states.


    Other display systems in the Stryker suffer from poor design, the CALL report states. The sensor for the Stryker’s Driver Vision Enhancer (DVE) is mounted in the center of the vehicle, even though the driver sits on the left. This requires a period of time for drivers to adjust to the centered view presented and makes it more difficult to drive the wheeled combat vehicle, CALL analysts concluded.


    Also, the driver’s DVE screen is too small and poorly located behind the steering wheel, making sharp turns difficult, and the wheel sometimes obscures parts of the screen, the CALL report states.


    A heads-up display provided to the vehicle commander also suffered from design problems, the report states. Break-away pressure for the helmet-mounted display was too high “and could cause neck injury if it gets caught on something and does not pull off,” according to the CALL report. It also states that the display was not useful in an urban environment because it caused a blind spot to the vehicle commander’s vision.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment