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MicroVision and Pioneer to Jointly Commercialize Innovative Laser Display Products

REDMOND, Wash.--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- MicroVision, Inc. (NASDAQ:MVIS - News), a leader in innovative ultra-miniature laser display technology, announced today that it has entered into a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with Pioneer Corporation, one of the top original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) of high-performance audio, video and computer equipment for the home, car and business markets, to develop, manufacture and distribute display engines and display engine subsystems for consumer and in-vehicle head-up displays (HUDs) using the MicroVision PicoP® laser display technology.

Earlier this year, the two companies executed a joint development agreement to develop two critical components of the PicoP display engine: a laser light source module using direct red, blue, and green lasers and a separate display engine subsystem based on MicroVision’s patented PicoP laser scanning technology. Both are key pieces of the next-generation PicoP display engine that will offer OEMs significant commercial advantages in price, size, power, and performance for embedded solutions ranging from cell phones and eyewear, to airplanes and automobiles.

The MOU establishes the framework of a future manufacturing and commercial distribution agreement for PicoP-based display engines to be used in consumer, after-market and embedded automotive products. Pioneer has announced it is targeting commercial introduction of an in-vehicle HUD using PicoP technology into the consumer market in 2012.

“Pioneer has a strong history of bringing cutting edge technologies to mass markets,” stated Alexander Tokman, president and CEO of MicroVision. “We believe that by combining our respective market and product development capabilities, and leveraging best practices in manufacturing, MicroVision and Pioneer can accelerate introducing next-generation laser display products while reducing the total cost for both companies in getting there.”

Both Pioneer and MicroVision were recently recognized as finalists for the CEATEC Innovation Awards for 2010. Pioneer was recognized in the Automotive category for its demonstration of a HUD using laser scanning technology provided by MicroVision, and MicroVision was recognized in the Components category for its SHOWWX™ laser pico projector, powered by the PicoP display engine.

About MicroVision

MicroVision provides the PicoP® display technology platform designed to enable next-generation display and imaging products for pico projectors, vehicle displays and wearable displays that interface with mobile devices. The company’s projection display engine uses highly efficient laser light sources which can create vivid images with high contrast and brightness. For more information, visit us on:

Our company website: www.microvision.com
Our corporate blog: www.microvision.com/displayground
Twitter: www.twitter.com/microvision
Facebook: www.facebook.com/MicrovisionInc
YouTube: www.youtube.com/mvisvideo

Forward-Looking Statements

Certain statements contained in this release, including those relating to future development and commercialization, which includes the risk that no definitive agreements result from the memorandum of understanding, and those using words such as “will” and “believe” are forward-looking statements that involve a number of risks and uncertainties. Factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those projected in the company's forward-looking statements include the following: our ability to raise additional capital when needed; our customers failure to perform under open purchase orders; our financial and technical resources relative to those of our competitors; our ability to keep up with rapid technological change; government regulation of our technologies; our ability to enforce our intellectual property rights and protect our proprietary technologies; the ability to obtain additional contract awards; the timing of commercial product launches and delays in product development; the ability to achieve key technical milestones in key products; dependence on third parties to develop, manufacture, sell and market our products; potential product liability claims; and other risk factors identified from time to time in the company's SEC reports, including the company's Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the SEC. Except as expressly required by federal securities laws, we undertake no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events, changes in circumstances or any other reason.


MicroVision Unveils Second-Generation Laser Pico Projector, SHOWWX+

Mobile Device Users Break Free from the Screen with 50 Percent Brighter Display and Simple Connection to Apple Devices

REDMOND, Wash., Nov 22, 2010 (BUSINESS WIRE) -- MicroVision, Inc., the leader in innovative ultra-miniature laser display technology, today unveiled SHOWWX+(R), the second-generation of its award-winning laser pico projector. With a 50 percent brighter display within the same slim size, SHOWWX+ enables mobile device users to break free from the small screen and project large, clear 16:9 widescreen content wherever they are, on any surface.

"We're on a mission to eliminate the squinting and huddling that occurs when mobile device users share content," said Alexander Tokman, president and CEO of MicroVision. "SHOWWX+ is designed to simply and quickly connect to today's hottest new portable devices so users can display and share large vibrant images and video with ease."

Taking the Mobile Experience Beyond the Small Screen

SHOWWX+ is the first laser pico projector to offer a big-screen, movie-length experience that easily slips into a shirt pocket. Boasting two hours of battery life, 15 laser lumens, a contrast ratio up to five times higher than competing products, and the shortest throw ratio of any pico projector on the market, the SHOWWX+ is the perfect accessory for expanding viewing experiences beyond a palm or pad-sized screen. Its category-leading 5,000:1 native contrast ratio ensures the SHOWWX+ produces the deepest blacks and most brilliant whites.

Touting a super short throw ratio, the SHOWWX+ displays large, bright images even in close or cramped environments, such as on the back of an airplane seat, a hallway or even an elevator. The shorter "throw" of SHOWWX+ allows users to project images that are twice as big as images from competing products from the same projection distance.

SHOWWX+ is a "Made for iPod, iPhone, and iPad" product that easily connects using the included high-quality video component cable. Users simply play media from their own device and it instantly projects. Combine an iPhone with an application such as Netflix and SHOWWX+ to get a big-screen movie experience virtually anywhere. SHOWWX+ works with many other devices as well, including mobile phones, notebooks, cameras and camcorders--anything with Video-Out or VGA functionality--casting a 12-inch to 100-inch diagonal image depending on lighting conditions, at resolutions up to WVGA (848 X 480).

Laser Displays Enable New Experiences

The SHOWWX+ is powered by MicroVision's PicoP(R) display engine, which uses patented laser-scanning technology to create large, vivid, uniform images that are always in focus, in the highest contrast, within the widest field of view. Unlike other pico projectors, SHOWWX+ does not require complex lenses, color wheels, lamps or LEDs. The architecture of the PicoP display engine not only contributes to the slim size of MicroVision's SHOWWX+--about the same size as an iPhone--it also allows for efficient power consumption enabling a longer battery life. The SHOWWX+ laser images are always in focus, regardless of variations in projection distance or display surface--a critical requirement for emerging ultra-mobile applications like iPhone games that use accelerometers and gyroscopes or augmented reality.

With MicroVision's laser-scanning technology, every pixel is the same intensity, creating vivid, saturated colors and brightness that are uniform from the center of the display to the edges. Lasers also produce all colors simultaneously, in a hundred-millionth of a second, avoiding color break-up or rainbow artifacts that are commonly experienced with other technologies in fast-moving video scenes, or when the projector or the viewer's head moves.

For a video overview of SHOWWX+, please visit the MicroVision SHOWWX+ micro-site.

Availability

SHOWWX+ is available now at an MSRP of $449. A full suite of optional accessories, including tripods, spare batteries, VGA connectors, car chargers and carrying cases are available on the MicroVision online store.

About MicroVision

MicroVision provides the PicoP(R) display technology platform designed to enable next-generation display and imaging products for pico projectors, vehicle displays and wearable displays that interface with mobile devices. The company's projection display engine uses highly efficient laser light sources which can create vivid images with high contrast and brightness. For more information, visit the company's website (www.microvision.com) and corporate blog (www.microvision.com/displayground).

MicroVision, SHOWWX, SHOWWX+ and PicoP are registered trademarks of MicroVision Inc. in the United States and other countries. All other trademarks are the properties of their respective owners.

Forward-Looking Statements

Certain statements contained in this release, including those using words such as "plans", are forward-looking statements that involve a number of risks and uncertainties. Factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those projected in the company's forward-looking statements include the following: our ability to raise additional capital when needed; our customers failure to perform under open purchase orders; our financial and technical resources relative to those of our competitors; our ability to keep up with rapid technological change; government regulation of our technologies; our ability to enforce our intellectual property rights and protect our proprietary technologies; the ability to obtain additional contract awards; the timing of commercial product launches and delays in product development; the ability to achieve key technical milestones in key products; dependence on third parties to develop, manufacture, sell and market our products; potential product liability claims; and other risk factors identified from time to time in the company's SEC reports, including the company's Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the SEC. Except as expressly required by federal securities laws, we undertake no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events, changes in circumstances or any other reason.

SOURCE: MicroVision, Inc.

Microvision Enhances Patent Position Through Purchase of Motorola Portfolio

REDMOND, Wash.--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- Microvision, Inc. (NASDAQ:MVIS - News), a leader in innovative ultra-miniature projection display technology, today announced it has purchased a significant patent portfolio from Motorola, Inc. that will extend the company’s intellectual property leadership in pico projection and display technology.

The portfolio purchased from Motorola’s subsidiary, Symbol Technologies, Inc., is the largest, broadest and earliest filed laser pico projection and display portfolio outside of Microvision’s. Motorola’s Symbol portfolio includes applications such as automotive head up display, 3D projection, range finding, portable media devices, image capture and laptop applications. The portfolio complements Microvision’s already extensive and highly-rated patent assets and brings Microvision’s total patent count to more than 500 patents, patents pending and licensed patents worldwide.

“Our fundamental mission as a company is to continuously innovate and anticipate the market's needs before others do,” said Alexander Tokman, President and CEO. “We firmly believe in the significant market opportunity for pico projectors, automotive displays, gaming devices and eyewear and the Motorola/Symbol patent portfolio presents a unique opportunity to enhance our key asset and substantially extend our leadership position in this space.”

Microvision has been recognized for the innovation, impact and breadth of its intellectual property by two prestigious industry organizations. In 2010, the company’s IP portfolio was ranked thirteenth among all global electronics companies by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), achieving the highest ranking of a U.S. company. The company has ranked in IEEE’s top 20 for the last three years, each year showing an improved rating. In 2009, Microvision was recognized by the Patent Board, in association with the Wall Street Journal, for the second year in a row as a top 50 IP portfolio holder with its ranking of thirty-eighth among all global industrial companies.

About Microvision

Microvision provides the PicoP® display technology platform designed to enable next-generation display and imaging products for pico projectors, vehicle displays and wearable displays that interface with mobile devices. The company's projection display engine uses highly efficient laser light sources which can create vivid images with high contrast and brightness. For more information, visit the company's website (www.microvision.com) and corporate blog (www.microvision.com/displayground).

Forward-Looking Statement

Certain statements contained in this release, including those relating to future market opportunities and applications, are forward-looking statements that involve a number of risks and uncertainties. Factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those projected in the company's forward-looking statements include the following: our ability to raise additional capital when needed; our customers' failure to perform under open purchase orders; our financial and technical resources relative to those of our competitors; our ability to keep up with rapid technological change; government regulation of our technologies; our ability to enforce our intellectual property rights and protect our proprietary technologies; the ability to obtain additional contract awards; the timing of commercial product launches and delays in product development; the ability to achieve key technical milestones in key products; dependence on third parties to develop, manufacture, sell and market our products; potential product liability claims; and other risk factors identified from time to time in the company's SEC reports, including the company's Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the SEC. Except as expressly required by federal securities laws, we undertake no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events, changes in circumstances or any other reason.

Microvision Integrates First Direct Green Lasers into Pico Projector Prototypes

Microvision Integrates First Direct Green Lasers into Pico Projector Prototypes

Critical Milestone Reached on the Company's Technology Roadmap to Support High Volume Product Requirements

REDMOND, Wash., Nov 01, 2010 (BUSINESS WIRE) -- Microvision, Inc., a leader in innovative ultra-miniature projection display technology, today announced it has successfully integrated the first "direct green" laser samples from two leading manufacturers into pico projector benchtop prototypes. This achievement represents an important first step toward the commercialization of PicoP(R) display engines using direct green lasers. The PicoP display engine utilizing a direct green laser is expected to offer significant commercial advantages in price, size, power, and performance.

"We are very pleased with the performance of these early direct green laser prototypes," commented Sid Madhavan, Microvision vice president, R&D and Applications. "These encouraging results give us confidence that direct green laser diodes will be capable of meeting the performance requirements for integration into our PicoP display platform."

Simplicity leads to lower costs

Microvision's current pico projection engine uses red and blue laser diodes and a frequency-doubled "synthetic" green laser to create a full color image. Synthetic green lasers are infrared lasers that are manipulated to reduce their wavelength to produce a green light. This conversion process creates a complex system of multiple components held to tight tolerances making manufacturing more challenging.

Direct green lasers are capable of producing green light natively, greatly simplifying laser design and manufacturing processes. Direct green lasers are expected to be manufactured in a manner similar to red and blue lasers available today, facilitating lower cost and rapid scalability to commercial quantities. The combination of smaller size, lower power, and lower cost make direct green lasers an attractive alternative to synthetic green lasers for Microvision's mobile display solutions.

Historically, availability of synthetic green lasers has been constrained due to their complexity and the existence of only two manufacturers. Today, there are at least five companies worldwide that have announced they are developing direct green lasers for late 2011 to mid 2012 commercial introduction. Industry researcher Yole Development forecasts that the direct green laser market size will reach about $500 million by 2016 and should represent more than 45 million devices.

About Microvision

Microvision provides the PicoP(R) display technology platform designed to enable next-generation display and imaging products for pico projectors, vehicle displays and wearable displays that interface with mobile devices. The company's projection display engine uses highly efficient laser light sources which can create vivid images with high contrast and brightness. For more information, visit the company's website (www.microvision.com) and corporate blog (www.microvision.com/displayground).

Forward-Looking Statements

Certain statements contained in this release, relating to future delivery, business success, operating results, company and third party product development, and potential product benefits, in addition to statements containing words such as "step toward," "will," "plans", are forward-looking statements that involve a number of risks and uncertainties. Factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those projected in the company's forward-looking statements include the following: our ability to raise additional capital when needed; our financial and technical resources relative to those of our competitors; our ability to keep up with rapid technological change; government regulation of our technologies; our ability to enforce our intellectual property rights and protect our proprietary technologies; the ability to obtain additional contract awards; the timing of commercial product launches and delays in product development; the ability to achieve key technical milestones in key products; dependence on third parties to develop, manufacture, sell and market our products; potential product liability claims; and other risk factors identified from time to time in the company's SEC reports, including the company's Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the SEC. Except as expressly required by federal securities laws, we undertake no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events, changes in circumstances or any other reason.

SOURCE: Microvision, Inc.





Project Tuatara preview: Enter 'infinite reality'

While it seems like the industry's penchant for hyperbole has long exhausted the best buzzwords, Microvision has coined a good one: "infinite reality." Not quite virtual reality, and not quite 3D, Microvision's "Project Tuatara" is a novel concept that enables a new kind of gaming.

Microvision Collaborates with Capcom and Intel to Introduce New Gaming Experience, Infinite Reality

Press Release Source: Microvision Inc. On Friday October 8, 2010, 9:00 am EDT

NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- This week at New York Comic Con, Microvision Inc. (NASDAQ:MVIS - News) and its Project Tuatara collaborators Capcom and Intel Corporation are showing off infinite reality gaming, an entirely new gaming experience that helps eliminate the barrier of fixed screens. Project Tuatara enables high-definition projected displays on any surface imaginable—no monitor or TV screen required—and delivers immersive movement to the PC gaming experience far beyond what consoles offer today. The technology will be demonstrated using one of the highest-scaling games Intel has tested on the Intel® Core™ i7 Processor Extreme Edition this year—Capcom’s “Lost Planet 2” for PCs, slated for release next week.

As a first step towards infinite reality gaming, Project Tuatara unlocks game play from the screen, enabling gamers to experience first-person shooter or third-person perspective video games all around them. The walls, ceiling and floor are now part of the action as gamers point the gun up to see the sky, and spin around to see what’s behind them. Project Tuatara will be available to experience at the Intel Extreme Masters booth (#726) on the show floor, as well as at an invitation-only party the evening of October 9 hosted by Capcom, Intel and Microvision.

“While the major gaming platforms are focused on 3D and controller-free gaming, Microvision is leveraging the unique characteristics of its ultra-miniature PicoP display technology to show how game play can also break free from the screen,” said Michael Fritts, vice president of sales, marketing and business development, Microvision. “Infinite reality gaming is much more realistic and exciting as gamers are free to roam and physically experience fantastic environments as if they were in them.”

Project Tuatara Explores Gaming’s Future

The Project Tuatara prototype gun is a battery operated, wireless HD video projection display and wireless controller, created to explore the market opportunity for Microvision’s gaming platform enabled by the PicoP® display engine. The latest design is based on a bullpup rifle that is lighter and easier to operate, and includes more programmable buttons. Microvision’s PicoP display engine, now embedded below the rifle’s sights, uses lasers and a single scanning mirror to cast a large, vivid, high-definition image that is always in focus with none of the rainbow artifact effects of other ultra-miniature projection technologies.

Combined with an Intel Core i7 Processor Extreme Edition-based PC and one of the most visually arresting games in the world—“Lost Planet 2” for the PC—gamers get an immersive and intense experience without compromising frame rates or system performance.

“Microvision and Intel are excited to demonstrate the next-generation of game play and show new levels of reality,” said Jeff Abbate, director of marketing, Intel Software and Services Group. “Microvision’s Project Tuatara takes advantage of the power of a system based on the Intel Core i7 Extreme Edition to deliver a realistic and intense gaming experience, giving users 360-degrees of freedom, without added lag or delays.”

"We've updated the massive enemies and epic settings of our console game to become one of the highest-performing PC games Intel has tested this year," said Christian Svensson, vice president of strategic planning & business development, Capcom. "With innovations like Project Tuatara, the immersive game play of ‘Lost Planet 2’ becomes an even more compelling experience. It highlights a possible future for gaming that's more real, more intense and more engaging than ever before."

Check Out Project Tuatara Live at New York Comic Con

Executives from Capcom, Intel and Microvision will be discussing the future of PC gaming and introducing Project Tuatara at a joint press conference on October 9 at 4 p.m., at the Intel Extreme Masters booth. Attendees will also experience Project Tuatara’s intense “infinite reality” while playing Capcom’s “Lost Planet 2” running on PC’s powered by Intel® Core™i7 Extreme Edition processors.

About Microvision

Microvision provides the PicoP display technology platform designed to enable next-generation display and imaging products for pico projectors, vehicle displays and wearable displays that interface with mobile devices. The company's projection display engine uses highly efficient laser light sources which can create vivid images with high contrast and brightness. For more information, visit the company's website (http://www.microvision.com) and corporate blog (http://www.microvision.com/displayground).

Forward-Looking Statements Disclaimer

Certain statements contained in this release, including those relating to future demonstrations, product introductions, applications and business prospects, as well as statements containing words like "plans," "will" and other similar expressions, are forward-looking statements that involve a number of risks and uncertainties. Factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those projected in the Company's forward-looking statements include the following: our ability to raise additional capital when needed; the risk of market acceptance of our technology and products, our financial and technical resources relative to those of our competitors; our ability to keep up with rapid technological change; our ability to enforce our intellectual property rights and protect our proprietary technologies; the timing of commercial product launches and delays in product development; the ability to achieve key technical milestones in key products; our ability to secure needed third party manufacturing and sales resources, dependence on third parties to develop, manufacture, sell and market our products; potential product liability claims and other risk factors identified from time to time in the Company's SEC reports, including the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the SEC. Except as expressly required by the federal securities laws, we undertake no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events, changes in circumstances or any other reason.

Heya



Hi everyone,

I know it has been way too long since I've had a chance to update the site. I've had a couple of folks send some notes to ask what's up....the simple answer is, I've been extremely busy with work and that has not left much time for blogging about work.

I'm working on what I consider to be very cool stuff and I'm really excited about it but can't really go into it too much right now. BUT -- this blog means a lot to me and I will be sure to dedicate some more energy towards getting it updated more frequently with information and updates that hopefully will be valuable (or at least interesting!) to you all.

Thanks for sticking with me and I'll get with you soon!

Ben



OASIS: Smart kitchen countertop makes you smarter than a cook

This smart kitchen countertop is destined to spruce up just about every user’s culinary skills. On display at the ninth annual Intel Research Day, held at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, CA the countertop’s functionality simply leaves you amazed. The Oasis recognizes the objects placed on it and provides helpful hints, nutritional information and recipes regarding the same. All of this is done with the help of 3-D depth perceiving camera and a pico projector. The camera allows the countertop to be touch sensitive and helps sense both the object and the hand in motion on its surface. A simple touch can summon all the images or video on a particular recipe. The counter can even suggest recipes based on two different types of foods placed atop. These images are projected on the surface using a pico projector made by Microvision. The countertop’s use can be stretched beyond the kitchen as well. It can be put to good use in bathrooms as well.



Green laser market to reach $500m by 2016

Green lasers for pico-projection applications will drive market growth.

The green laser diode market will reach a value of $500m by 2016 according to market analyst Yole Développement of France. In its report entitled Green Lasers for Projection Devices, Yole provides a complete analysis of the projector applications for green laser diodes and looks at the progress being made by laser manufacturers in terms of both direct emission in the green and using nonlinear crystals to access the green via frequency doubling.

The report also includes dollar and unit values on the 2009–2016 timescale for green laser diode devices and a study of the related gallium nitride market.

"The green laser market today is highly segmented in numerous niche applications from medical to military applications and laser shows," says Yole. "Those applications can work with existing solid-state lasers or the more recent combinations of semiconductor lasers with nonlinear crystals performing second harmonic generation."

Only frequency-doubled laser diodes are available today. "Corning, OSRAM and QD Laser having each their proprietary solution to green light generation," explains Philippe Roussel, project manager at Yole Développement. "However, given the complex package of these lasers, it seems difficult to reach a reasonable target price. Moreover, these components seem to suffer from a shortage situation."

According to Yole, Sumitomo SEI, KAAI (UCSB) and OSRAM are the most advanced players when it comes to direct-emission green laser diodes. If performance meets the minimum requirements for optical power, wall-plug efficiency and lifetime, products could be available in limited quantities as soon as the middle of 2011. The battle for a direct-emission green source will also take place at the substrate level where non-polar and semi-polar gallium nitride crystals play a very positive role in green wavelength emission.

In the emerging markets of pico-projectors, head-mounted displays and head-up displays, the ideal light-emitting device is a laser thanks to its ability to deliver highly saturated colours in the widest possible gamut. Additional advantageous properties are focus-free operation and an improved wall-plug efficiency that would allow battery operation. "The first LED-based pico-projectors hit the market in 2009 but have been slow to take off. No more than 300,000 units have been sold," says Yole. "The poor brightness (10 lumen) for a relative high price might be a reason for this. In the same year, some impressive progress has been published on the capability to shift blue laser diodes towards the green. A direct-emission semiconductor laser should be available in the coming years (2011–2012) to serve the projection display applications."

According to Yole, the green laser diode market size will reach around $500m by 2016, which will represent more than 45 million devices. The analyst provides the following breakdown:

Stand-alone projectors: this market will really take off in 2010 with a sales volume of around 0.5–1 million units. During this first phase, most of the sales will be LED-based but the analyst forecasts 10–20% will be laser-based by 2011 and that this ratio will grow to 50–75% by 2016. Yole also envisions a natural move from standalone to embedded devices as the technology becomes more compatible with size and cost constraints.

Mobile phones: this market will start late in 2010 with high-end devices. Laser-based systems will be slowly implemented along with cost reduction. Yole stays very conservative saying that LEDs will strongly dominate at least until 2016. Because of the small size requirement, a direct-emission green laser will be highly recommended.

Media players: these are the perfect locations for embedded pico-projectors. There are fewer cost constraints and size issues compared with mobile phones. Yole predicts that the boom should occur by 2012, with 2.6–5 million units equipped with projection functionality. Frequency-doubled green lasers should dominate initially until direct emission is price and performance compatible.

Camera and camcorder: "We forecast a slow market penetration for laser-based technologies as the battery lifetime and cost can become critical parameters. LED technology should dominate in these applications," says Regis Hamelin, Yole Développement's market and technology analyst.

Laptop: Yole states that this is the most unclear segment because it is hard to accurately predict the behaviour of consumers: will they go for an all-in-one solution (PC plus projector) with an embedded projection device that will probably be less efficient than desktop projectors? Yole Développement remains very conservative on this application.

Report: Pocket Projector Market Poised for Rapid Growth



According to market research firm DisplaySearch's recently released Pocket Projector Technology and Market Forecast Report, the market for pocket projectors is poised for strong growth in 2010 and beyond. DisplaySearch forecasts that the total pocket projector market will grow from 0.5 million units and $117 million in revenues in 2009 to 142 million units and $13.9 billion in revenues in 2018, a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 70 percent for revenues and 88 percent for units (as shown in the graph here, which is from the report).

"There were over 130 new pocket projector models released in the market in 2009, along with the first releases of embedded projectors into the market. Despite this, pocket projectors still face challenges of low brightness, short battery life and high price. Continuing progress in all the technologies surrounding pocket projectors will be needed to achieve the expected growth," noted Jennifer Colegrove. Director of Display Technologies at DisplaySearch.

The pocket projector market is currently dominated by stand-alone devices, which can be connected to other devices, and allow for additional integrated functions. DisplaySearch forecasts the stand-alone pocket projector will reach 45 million units and $8.9 billion in 2018.

However, DisplaySearch forecasts that shipments of embedded/dedicated projectors will surpass those of stand-alone units in 2014, as current limitations such as power consumption, size, brightness and price are improved. DisplaySearch forecasts the embedded type pocket projectors will reach 97 million units and $5 billion in 2018.

Although pocket projectors leveraging LCOS (liquid crystal on silicon) with color filters dominated in 2009 due to early entrance in the pocket projector market, DisplaySearch forecasts that DLP (Texas Instruments' Digital Light Processing) and LCOS field sequential technologies will take the lead in shipments for 2010. While LCOS field sequential will have the highest unit share in coming years, DLP will lead in revenues. The fastest growing technology in unit and revenue terms will be scanning MEMS (Microvision's Micro-Electro-Mechanical System, which employs a mirror for scanning).

Microvision Announces First Quarter 2010 Results

Company Reports Record $16.7 Million Backlog for PicoP Based Products

Press Release Source: Microvision, Inc. On Monday May 10, 2010, 4:00 pm EDT

REDMOND, Wash.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Microvision, Inc. (NASDAQ:MVIS - News), a leader in innovative ultra-miniature projection display technology, today reported operating and financial results for the first quarter of 2010.

Operating Results

“I’m pleased to report we have received purchase orders of over $16.7 million for PicoP® based products, both the accessory pico projector and PicoP display engine, through our distribution channels in Asia, Europe and North America,” stated Alexander Tokman, President and CEO. “We continue to focus on improving our production and supply chain capabilities to meet this strong demand and with the recent addition of a second qualified green laser supplier, we are confident that we can fulfill product deliveries in increased volumes to our distribution partners and continue to accept additional purchase orders.”

Key business and technical milestones achieved during the first quarter:

* Commercial release of the SHOWWX™ laser pico projector in the U.S.
* Completion of the design and supply of early evaluation samples of the new low power PicoP laser display engine to OEMs.
* Receipt of the largest single product order in the company’s history for the PicoP engine.
* Also in the first quarter, Microvision’s SHOWWX laser pico projector won several top industry awards for its notable design and performance at the annual Consumer Electronics Show (CES) and Macworld, including:

* The “CES Innovations 2010 Design and Engineering Award”.
* The popular vote for “Last Gadget Standing” from CES.
* “Best of Show” selected by the editors of Macworld.

Microvision’s innovation and strong patent portfolio were recognized by two prestigious global IP organizations:

* The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) ranked Microvision’s IP as 13th among global companies for patent pipeline power and 1st among U.S. based companies in the sector of electronics. Microvision has been recognized by IEEE as a top 20 electronics company for its patent portfolio strength over the past three years, each year showing an improved rating.
* The Patent Board as published in the Wall Street Journal, ranked Microvision in the top 50 global companies for the second consecutive year for U.S. patent filings.

Financial Results

The following financial results are for the three months ended March 31, 2010, compared to the same period one year earlier.

* Revenue of $668,000, compared to $951,000. The company’s revenue has decreased as it transitions away from its historical contract revenue model and initiates commercialization of products based on its PicoP technology.
* Backlog of $16.7 million at March 31, 2010, compared to $617,000. The record increase in backlog is composed almost exclusively of orders for the company’s PicoP embedded engine and its SHOWWX laser pico projector.
* Operating loss of $9.5 million, compared to $9.1 million. The increased operating loss was due to both higher operating costs attributable to the launch of the SHOWWX product and lower contract revenue in 2010.
* Net loss of $9.1 million, or $0.10 per share compared to $8.9 million, or $0.13 per share.
* Net cash used in operating activities of $9.6 million, compared to $8.8 million. The increase was attributable to a higher net loss and an increase in working capital requirements to ramp SHOWWX production.
* The company ended the quarter with $35.6 million in cash, cash equivalents and investment securities.

The company will discuss its operating and financial results and current business operations during its conference call at 4:30 p.m. ET / 1:30 p.m. PT today.

About Microvision

Microvision provides the PicoP® display technology platform designed to enable next-generation display and imaging products for pico projectors, vehicle displays and wearable displays that interface with mobile devices. The company’s projection display engine uses highly efficient laser light sources which can create vivid images with high contrast and brightness. For more information, visit the company’s website (www.microvision.com) and corporate blog (www.microvision.com/displayground).

Forward Looking Statement

Certain statements contained in this release, including those relating to operating results, product development, future distribution and growth and potential product benefits are forward-looking statements that involve a number of risks and uncertainties. Factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those projected in the company's forward-looking statements include the following: capital market risks, our ability to raise additional capital when needed; market acceptance of our technologies and products; our financial and technical resources relative to those of our competitors; our ability to keep up with rapid technological change; our dependence on the defense industry and a limited number of government development contracts; government regulation of our technologies; our ability to enforce our intellectual property rights and protect our proprietary technologies; the ability to obtain additional contract awards; the timing of commercial product launches and delays in product development; the ability to achieve key technical milestones in key products; dependence on third parties to develop, manufacture, sell and market our products; our customers’ or our failure to perform under open purchase orders; potential product liability claims, and other risk factors identified from time to time in the company's SEC reports and other filings, including the company's Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the SEC. Except as expressly required by the federal securities laws, we undertake no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events, changes in circumstances or any other reason.



Redmond, WA company creates laser projector the size of an iPod

by GLENN FARLEY / KING 5 News
Posted on April 5, 2010 at 6:02 PM
Updated today at 6:55 PM

******

REDMOND, Wash. -- We usually think of lasers as a pinpoint or streak of light. We might use it as a pointer during a presentation, or in a tool that tells us if the picture we're hanging on the wall is level.

But could lasers create an image of an actual picture, even in color? The answer is simple: yes. That's if you have the technology.

After more than a decade of research, Microvision put its SHOWWX projector onto the U.S. market Friday. The projector is the size of an Apple iPod and projects a 16x9 wide-screen standard definition onto anything.

There is no lens, so as you move the SHOWWX closer to or away from the wall, or even cock it an angle or show it into a corner, everything is in focus. You could use SHOWWX for Power Point presentations to small groups, show family photos or videos. If a device can output a standard video signal, Microvision says the SHOWWX can display it in full color.

"We've got three lasers, a red, a green and a blue," said Matthew Carmean, the SHOWWX's product manager. The projector is the size of an iPod, but unlike an iPod, it has an interchangeable rechargeable battery. But there is also a docking station to hook it up to a personal computer or a netbook.

At $549, it's not cheap. In the world of small digital projectors, it's at the higher end of the range, but it is the smallest and only laser based system.

Microvision says the SHOWWX projector is just one form of this laser technology. The heart of the system is the PicoP engine. It's a thin angular box that's not much bigger than a quarter. Inside is the lasers and a mirror that project the image one pixel at a time, really, really fast.

But the PicoP could be built into a lot of other things. Someday you might find a netbook with a projector built in, or maybe it lives inside your phone.

Marketing Director Matt Nichols says Intel's "Intel Inside" strategy is similar to what Microvision wants to do. Intel may not make the computer, but it makes the processor inside that allows everything else to work.

"Our strategy is that Microvision will be inside hundreds of devices." said Nichols.

OK, if you're hooked, how do you get this thing? Right now, it's only available from Microvision's Web site at www.microvision.com. But Nichols says it should be in stores by the second half of the year.

But while the projector is the first Microvision product on the market, it springs from a long line of research.

Microvision began in 1997 as a small startup near Boeing Field. The plan was to run with a technology that used low powered lasers to actually project an image directly into the eye. The technology literally paints a picture onto the retina. The advantage is that a person using the technology, such as a pilot or a tank commander or even a surgeon, can see data like compass headings and maps or an x-ray, without taking their eyes off their work. The laser picture is "see-thru."

Microvision has also developed camera technology that uses lasers to record an image in color. Such a camera would capture at a high level of detail and could be used in surgical and other applications.

As for high detail, a high definition model of the company's projector is in the works.



Yamaguchi Center for Arts and Media: Desire of Codes

Seiko Mikami, new installation "Desire of Codes"
20 March – 6 June 2010
10:00-19:00

From perceiving cells to the coded individual

The desire of encoding vs. the human body's refusal of being coded

Seiko Mikami creates precise depictions of the gradually transforming relationship between information technology and sensory perception in artworks focusing from unique perspectives on the human body and its forms of existence. This retrospective overview of her activities is a large-scale solo exhibition centering around a new installation piece (commissioned by and created at YCAM), shown here along with two related new works.

The new piece titled "Desire of Codes", exhibited at YCAM's Studio A with 3 different pieces. One is consists of a wall installation of objects responding to the movements of audiences, "laser projector" was equipped with 6 robot arms are follow the movement of the audience from the ceiling and special 3.5m screen that resembles an insect's multifaceted eye.

The entire inorganic apparatus begins to move like a wriggling living being according to the motion detected by built-in small surveillance camera in the exhibition space. The images recorded by these cameras are mixed with footage from surveillance cameras installed at places around the world. Create own database of audience's images the resulting fragmentary recombinations of time and space are projected onto a large insect eyes compound screen.

The central theme of this exhibition is the state of a society in which programming languages, genetic codes, personal information, and even matters of individual interest and taste are being converted into codes. Audience who experience this artwork stands face to face with his or her own observed and encoded existence, the resulting data/codes, and ultimately, the repercussions of "the body as data" and "the desire of codes." By turning the audiences bodies into both the objects of observation and artistic expression, this work aims to redefine our position in a time when all kinds of environments - including those of everyday life- are increasingly being information oriented society.





Hi all,

It was great to participate at this year's SXSW Interactive. I was on a panel called "What If Your Phone Had 5 Senses?", alongside Ted Power and Nicholas Jitkoff from Google, and Matt Biddulph of Nokia. There was a pretty robust discussion, and (no surprise!) it seemed to me like the main thesis that emerged was that a variety of sensors will be integrated to form a foundation of "awareness" upon which new types of displays, including pico projectors and eyewear, can be placed to form a totally new user interface, and a new way of experiencing the internet.

A lot to get through in a one hour talk! But familiar and fun territory, and it was enjoyable for me to learn from my co-panelists and to share my perspectives with them and with attendees. Be sure to check out the story below from KXAN, Austin's NBC station, about the event, and here's a link to some of the panel's buzz on Twitter.

Austin is just a great city and although I overdid it a little on the ribs, I'm excited for my next chance to visit. Big thanks to Ted Power of Google for the invitation to participate!




KXAN Austin: Gadgets sweep tech world


Organizers: It's a glimpse into the future

Updated: Monday, 15 Mar 2010, 9:00 AM CDT
Published : Sunday, 14 Mar 2010, 10:53 PM CDT

Mary Lee
AUSTIN (KXAN) - SXSW Interactive Festival showcased the newest gadgets to sweep the tech world.

"It was a glimpse of the future," said SXSW attendee Alex Slotkin. "With the iPhone and smart phone, you see where all this is heading."

Laser projectors are one of the newest innovations at the Interactive Festival.

"Different sensors like GPS radars, multitouch interfaces can be combined to enable totally new experiences for people," said Ben Averch, Microvision Global product marketing manager.

The Show WX Laser Pico Projector can display videos and pictures on any surface, and it is always in focus no matter how far away the laser is to the surface.

But it is not the only futuristic innovation showcased at the SXSW Interactive Festival. Another gadget will literally change the way we view the world.

"What Microvision is developing is a see-through eyewear with a laser-based display, so wherever you go, virtual information can be superimposed on your field of view," said Averch.

The military is already using the high-tech eyewear, but Microvision wants to bring its eyewear to the public.

"You could be walking around in a new town, and with the Microvision eyewear technology, you could follow a virtual arrow to your destination," said Averch.

Many SXSW attendees liked what they saw.

"Well, we're all geeks," said Slotkin. "A lot of us wouldn't think twice about putting a funky pair of glasses on our heads."

Experts said these visionary gadgets will be available in the near future.

"I'd suggest within five years you'll see this sort of eyewear and augmented reality type of applications," said Averch.

Microvision SHOWWX Laser Pico Projector Available for Sale to U.S. Customers

Press Release Source: Microvision, Inc. On Monday March 8, 2010, 6:30 am EST

REDMOND, Wash.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Microvision, Inc. (NASDAQ: MVIS - News), a leading developer of ultra-miniature projection display products announced today the opening of its web store for U.S. customers for the SHOWWX™ laser pico projector. Microvision is introducing two product offerings in the U.S. -- the Standard Edition SHOWWX and the Limited Edition SHOWWX promotional bundle.

Web Store Opens for U.S. Sales of the Standard Edition SHOWWX on March 24

Microvision plans to begin taking on-line orders through its web store at 12 noon, EST, starting on March 24th for its award-winning SHOWWX laser pico projector. The "Made for iPod®" SHOWWX laser pico projector Standard Edition comes with accessories and an optional VGA dock to connect to a variety of mobile devices. The iPhone®-sized Standard Edition is priced at $549.

Special One Time Limited Edition SHOWWX Bundle Promotion Begins Today

To celebrate the introduction of the world’s first laser pico projector based on Microvision’s PicoP® technology in the United States, Microvision is offering U.S. customers a one-time opportunity to purchase a special Limited Edition SHOWWX bundle. The Limited Edition SHOWWX bundle is for the technology enthusiast and ultra-mobile media connoisseur. This special bundle comes with a personalized splash screen bearing the name of its owner, SHOWWX with 'Limited Edition' insignia, certificate of authenticity and a SHOWWX VGA dock plus other accessories not included with the Standard Edition. The Microvision web store with details about the Limited Edition SHOWWX bundle will open starting today at 12 noon, EST, www.microvision.com/showwx. The SHOWWX Limited Edition bundle is priced at $999.

The SHOWWX is the world’s first laser-based pico projector that delivers premium image quality generated by Microvision's PicoP® laser projection technology. Features include a native resolution of WVGA (848 X 480), ultra-simple plug-and-play use, fiddle-free infinite focus, very high-contrast ratio, and bright vivid colors generated from ultra-miniature laser light sources. Users simply connect the SHOWWX to any mobile device with TV or VGA out (iPod, laptop, etc.) and project DVD-quality images from a mobile device, up to 200” across, depending on the ambient light.

About Microvision (www.microvision.com)

Microvision provides the PicoP display engine platform designed to enable next-generation display and imaging products for pico projectors, vehicles displays and wearable displays that interface to mobile devices. The company’s projection display engine uses highly efficient laser light sources which can create vivid images with high contrast and brightness. For more information, visit the company’s website (www.microvision.com) and corporate blog (www.microvision.com/displayground).

“iPod” and “iPhone” are registered trademarks of Apple Inc.

Forward-Looking Statements Disclaimer

Certain statements contained in this release, including those relating to the introduction, timing and quantity of future products and words such as “plans,” are forward-looking statements that involve a number of risks and uncertainties. Factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those projected in the Company's forward-looking statements include the following: our ability to raise additional capital when needed; our financial and technical resources relative to those of our competitors; our ability to keep up with rapid technological change; government regulation of our technologies; our ability to enforce our intellectual property rights and protect our proprietary technologies; the ability to obtain additional contract awards; the timing of commercial product launches and delays in product development; the ability to achieve key technical milestones in key products; dependence on third parties to develop, manufacture, sell and market our products; and potential product liability claims and other risk factors identified from time to time in the Company's SEC reports, including the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the SEC. Except as expressly required by the federal securities laws, we undertake no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events, changes in circumstances or any other reason.



A Tribute To The Laser, 50 Years On

All Tech Considered marks 2010 with a tribute — from musician and writer David Was — to the laser, which turns 50 years old this year. Was checks out new laser gadgets at this year's Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.

And now, a tribute to a technology that is not new. It's old enough to become the butt of movie jokes - from the likes of "Austin Powers," spoofing James Bond movies. It's the laser.

Mr. BEN AVERCH (Global Product Manager, Microvision): I love lasers personally.

Mr. WAS: Ben Averch, the global product manager from Microvision, was unstinting in his affection for the beam and its role in his product, the show WX laser pico-projector.

Mr. AVERCH: Due to the quality of the laser light, we get about 240 percent of the available colors that you can see as opposed to an LED-based system.



-- Sent from my Palm Pre



-- Sent from my Palm Pre

Lol



-- Sent from my Palm Pre



-- Sent from my Palm Pre



-- Sent from my Palm Pre



-- Sent from my Palm Pre

The booth!

About 90 minutes to show time...!


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